Blog: From the Boardroom

Various articles written a by members of the Richardson Chamber leadership about topics of interest to the Richardson community.

David Aaker is well-known for his expertise in marketing and his ability to help businesses thrive and exceed their goals. His branding concepts, including identifying customer's interests and creating a community or story around those interests, has made him an icon in the business world. In a constantly evolving marketplace, David Aaker's work can teach us to develop strong leadership in the workplace. Business owners of all sizes rely on Mr. Aaker's expertise and training to improve their marketing, but

Teamwork is critical for businesses in just about every industry, so it is likely that you will work as part of a team at some point in your career. Depending on your position within your organization, you may be called upon as a team leader as well. Here's what you need to know to keep your team members focused and ensure they follow your lead for exceptional results.

Sitting for hours puts a lot of stress on the body. If you suffer from back and leg pain, then you've likely noticed that the longer you sit, the more uncomfortable you feel. According to a study conducted by the CDC in 2011, standing can reduce back pain by 54 percent. Standing also promotes better circulation, helping to prevent leg pain.

​Building a positive workplace culture results in happier employees, which in turn, improves efficiencies and creates more satisfied clients. Basically, a happy workplace is good for everyone. The question is, how can you create a positive, supporting workplace culture quickly. Check out these tips to get started.

There are many things business owners wish they would have done differently. Here are some common themes that seem to come to light. Giving back to the community does not have to be a challenge – doing simple things on a routine basis can help to make a big difference in the community.

Although your employees won't have defenders trying to tackle them (hopefully), they'll still come across a variety of setbacks and complications when working on projects. Just like a quarterback in football, your team leader needs to have protections in place as well, so they can execute your plan.

Education is the economic driver of success and production in our communities. It starts in kindergarten, and on up to 12th grade. When students receive support at the beginning, they're more likely to pursue higher education, whether as part of a trade program or a university. They're more likely to understand civic responsibility and community engagement.

Some entrepreneurs build their businesses as their legacy. Others view their greatest impact as what they leave behind within the community. It is the steps they take to make the community better than they found it. Many of our members look to find the good and praise it. They volunteer, give away their time, providing discounts on products or services, or simply give their knowledge. They work to support charities, children's activities, and seniors. They listen, learn, and act to help others in our

Find out what your business can learn from high-end service-orientated enterprises. Pay attention to details.

Cameron Herold, also known as the CEO Whisperer, has lots to say about running meetings. Although many in the business world complain about meetings, Herold claims that it is not the meetings themselves that are so horrible, but rather the inexperience of those running them. He recommends following these tips for memorable, effective meetings.